Join us for a Chat with the authors of the Brewing science laboratory, 
Sean Johnson and Michael Mosher


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Questions? Contact Bryan Mowry at ASBC​


Summary

This discussion was designed to help brewers understand the importance of implementing and maintaining a quality assurance program. As microbrewery openings continue to increase annually, so do the number of ​microbrewery closings. The reasons behind this reveal some interesting hypotheses about starting a brewery. As the market gets more crowded, only those that produce quality beer in a consistent manner will survive.

The keys to a consistent product lie in the implementation of a robust quality assurance program. This discussion guides you through building a brewery laboratory from the ground up, providing you with the necessary background information and scientific knowledge behind each process. Sean and Micheal include specific information about specialized glassware, instruments, and procedures.


Takeaways


The brewery laboratory is a vital part of the brewery – and is complementary to the production of beer that is consistent in quality. To be successful, each staff member must be trained in the specific instruments, procedures, and hazards found in the laboratory. Whether your goal is to start a new laboratory, build upon an existing one, or train new staff, the information in this discussion will help.


About the Authors


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SEAN JOHNSON discovered the vast world of brewing during his undergraduate classes, realizing the variety of career opportunities the industry offered beyond the typical brewery positions of brewer, cellarman, and packaging specialist. He started his master’s program in chemistry in the fall of 2014 to pursue a career in brewing laboratory science.

After graduation, Sean got a job in the malt research laboratory at a major brewery but continued to be involved with the brewing laboratory science program at the University of Northern Colorado (UNC). As the program continued to grow, he was offered the opportunity to start a teaching career.



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MICHAEL MOSHER got his first exposure to craft beer in the mid-1980s, when he was an undergraduate student, by spending his spare time helping out as a brewer's assistant at a local brewpub. As a professor in Nebraska in the early 2000s, he started a course in brewing science as a way to teach science to students who claimed not to like science. In response to the growing craft brewing industry, Mike started the brewing laboratory science program at U NC in 2012.

Mike has a Diploma in Brewing qualification from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling (UK) and is currently halfway through his studies to obtain the Master Brewer qualification.